Wednesday, April 18, 2012

29th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Pensacola in February, 1862, by the addition of two companies to the Fourth Alabama battalion - a body of eight companies, which had been organized the autumn before at Montgomery. The regiment remained at Pensacola till it was evacuated, suffering much from diseases that usually afflict raw troops. It then lay between Pollard and Pensacola for over a year, when it was ordered to Mobile, and there remained from July 1863 to April 1864, save a short time that it was at Pollard. The regiment then joined the Army of Tennessee at Resaca, in time to initiate the Atlanta-Dalton campaign, and was brigaded with the First, Seventeenth, and Twenty-sixth of Alabama, and Thirty-seventh of Mississippi regiments, commanded at different intervals by Col. Murphey of Montgomery, Gen. O'Neal of Lauderdale, and Gen. Shelley of Talladega. The Twenty-ninth was engaged at the battle of Resaca with a loss of about 100 killed and wounded, out of 1100 men engaged. At New Hope the loss was very heavy, and at Peach-tree Creek the regiment was cut to pieces. Again, July 28, near Atlanta, half of the regiment was killed and wounded in the fierce and protracted assault on the enemy's line. The Twenty-ninth then moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost very heavily in casualties at Franklin, and largely in casualties and prisoners at Nashville. A remnant of it moved into the Carolinas, and was engaged at Kinston and Bentonville with considerable loss. About 90 men surrendered at Greensboro, N.C.




Field and Staff

Colonels - J.R.F Tatnall of Georgia; transferred to the navy. John F. Conoley of Dallas.

Lieutenant Colonels - J.F. Conoley; promoted. Benjamin Morris of Barbour.

Majors - Benj. Morris; promoted. Henry B. Turner of Talladega; wounded at Atlanta.

Adjutants - Lemuel D. Hatch of Greene; transferred. Benjamin H. Screws of Barbour; transferred to line. James Stephenson of Virginia.




Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Talladega - Henry B. Turner; promoted. E. Orear; wounded at Resaca; killed at Franklin.

Blount - Duncan Dew; wounded at Atlanta.

Blount - Wm. H. Musgrove; died in the service. John M. Hanna; killed at Atlanta.

Bibb - Alfred V. Gardner; wounded at Resaca and Franklin.

Shelby - Samuel Abernethy.

Blount - B.F. Sapp; died in service. T.J. Smitherman.

Barbour - John F. Wagnon; resigned. John A. Forster; wounded at Resaca; captured at Nashville.

Bibb - Hugh Latham; died in the service. Berry G. Brown; killed at Nashville.

Conecuh - J.B. Sowell; died in the service. Ulee W. Mills; killed at Atlanta. John B. Allen; killed at Franklin.

Barbour - John C. McNab; resigned. J.C. Hailey; killed at Atlanta. Benjamin H. Screws; wounded at Atlanta.


Tuesday, January 17, 2012

28th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Shelby Springs, March 29, 1862, about 1100 strong, to serve "for three years or the war." Shortly after the battle of Shiloh, the regiment reached Corinth, where many of the men died of disease. Brigaded under Gen. T. Rapier (shortly after succeeded by Gen. Duncan and Col. Manigault), with the Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, and Thirty-fourth Alabama - to which the Twenty-fourth Alabama was soon after added - the Twenty-eighth was first under fire in a skirmish at Corinth, where it lost two men. From Tupelo to Chattanooga, thence into Kentucky with Gen. Bragg, and the regiment fell back to middle Tennessee with the army. It fought at Murfreesboro with many casualties, but captured a battery. The winter and spring were passed near Tullahoma, and the regiment was hotly engaged at Chicamauga, losing largely in killed and wounded. At Lookout Mountain the regiment was nearly surrounded by the enemy, and fought desperately, losing 172 killed, wounded, and captured. It was also engaged two days later at Mission Ridge with some loss. During the winter, at Dalton, the Twenty-eighth re-enlisted "for the war." It participated in the severe campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, taking part in all the fighting, and losing largely in proportion to the men it had present for duty. The regiment followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and took part in the desperate and fruitless struggles at Franklin and Nashville, with severe loss. From that tragic theatre it went to North Carolina, where it was consolidated with the Twenty-fourth and Thirty-fourth Alabama, with J.C. Carter of Montgomery as colonel, Starke H. Oliver of Mobile as lieutenant colonel, and P.G. Wood of Dallas as major. The regiment surrendered at Greenesboro, N.C. in Sharpe's brigade, Hill's division, S.D. Lee's corps.



Field and Staff

Colonel - J.W. Frazer* of Tennessee; resigned. J.C. Reid.

Lieutenant Colonels - John C. Reid of Perry; promoted. W. Lavelle Butler; wounded and captured at Nashville.

Majors - T.W.W. Davies of Coosa; transferred to the navy. W.L. Butler; promoted.

Adjutants - Sumter Lee of Perry; resigned. Charles R. Harris of Perry; wounded and captured at Nashville.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Perry - W. Lavelle Butler; promoted. James H. Graham; wounded at Chicamauga; resigned. John F. Wilson; wounded at Franklin.

Blount and Marshall - John H. Turpin; wounded and captured at Murfreesboro. E.R. Kiker; captured at Mission Ridge.

Blount - .... Tidmore; resigned. John Couch.

Jefferson - Wm. M. Nabors.

Walker - H.A.M. Henderson; resigned. H.G. Loller; killed at Resaca. Lieut. Robert S. Cox commanded.

Walker - F.A. Gamble; resigned. L.E. Gilbert.

Jefferson - .... Miller; resigned. John C. Morrow; resigned. G.W. Hewitt; wounded at Murfreesboro and Chicamauga.

Jefferson - J.F. Tarrant; resigned. W.M. Hawkins; killed at Murfreesboro. Wm. R. McAdory; killed at Mission Ridge. Wm. A. McLeod; killed at Atlanta.

Dallas - F.M. Hopkins; captured at Mission Ridge. Lieutenant P.G. Wood commanded.

Perry - Charles R. Harris; resigned. Homer M. Ford.

Walker - F.A. Musgrove; wounded at Murfreesboro.


Monday, August 29, 2011

27th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at St. Heinian, Tennessee, a number of companies having flocked to that point, in the winter of 1861. Ordered to Fort Henry, the regiment shared in the defence of that place, but retired before its surrender, and formed part of the garrison of Fort Donelson. It took part in that memorable conflict, and was there surrendered. A number of the command were in hospitals, &c, and these were not captured, but organized into two companies, joined the Thirty-third Mississippi, and lost 8 killed and 25 wounded at the battle of Perryville. The main body of the regiment was exchanged in September 1862, and was ordered to Port Hudson, where it was joined by the other two companies. It remained in that quarter during the winter, and was brigaded under Gen. Buford of Kentucky, Loring's division. It was then in the trenches at Jackson for ten days, and retreated with the army across the Pearl. The regiment passed the winter at Canton, and in the spring of 1864 was sent to the vicinity of Tuscumbia to recruit, being greatly reduced in numbers. A detachment of the regiment crossed the Tennessee, and captured about 100 of the enemy in April 1864. It was soon after ordered to Dalton, and placed in Scott's brigade with the Twelfth Louisiana, and Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama regiments - Loring's division, Stewart's corps. The Twenty-seventh was from that time forward a sharer in the vicisitudes of the Army of Tennessee, fighting with much loss throughout the Atlanta-Dalton campaign, and forming part of the last confederate wave of battle as it swept beyond the bloody abatis at Franklin, and beat vainly against the gates of Nashville. A mere skeleton of the regiment proceeded to the Carolinas, where it was consolidated with the Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama regiments, and was surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. April 1865.



Field and Staff

Colonels - A.A. Hughes of Franklin; captured at Fort Donelson; died in the service. James Jackson of Lauderdale; wounded at Kennesa.

Lieutenant Colonels - James Jackson; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. Edward McAlexander of Lauderdale.

Majors - Edward McAlexander; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. R.G. Wright of Franklin.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.*

Franklin - J.B. Moore; till re-organized. Robert Watson; superceded. H. Rodgers; wounded at Kinston.

Franklin - R.G. Wright; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. F. LeB. Goodwin.

Lauderdale - Empson B. Dudley; captured at Fort Donelson; wounded in Georgia.

Lawrence - H.B. Irwin of Lawrence; captured at Fort Donelson; wounded at Kinston.

Lauderdale - T.A. Jones; till re-organized. Rob't Andrews.

Madison - .... Roberts; till re-organized. John Corn.

Franklin - Tho's B. M'Cullough; transferred. W.A. Isbell; killed at Baker's Creek. S.S. Anderson; wounded at Franklin.

Morgan - ..... Humphrey; till re-organized. John B. Stewart.

Lawrence - Henry A. McGhee; resigned. Tho's McGhee.

Lauderdale - Hugh L. Ray; captured at Fort Donelson.



*Capt. Wm. Word, commanding one of the companies in this regiment attached to the Thirty-third Mississippi, was killed at Perryville.

Monday, August 15, 2011

26th - 50th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Corinth, in March 1862, by the consolidation of two battalions then recently recruited. Placed in the brigade of Gen. Gladden, it fought at Shiloh with a loss of 12 killed and 111 wounded out of about 700 engaged. Gen. Gardner having taken command of the brigade -- the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth and Thirty-ninth Alabama regiments -- the Twenty-sixth Fiftieth moved into Kentucky, and lost about 20 men in combat with Gen. Sill's division. It participated in the battle of Murfreesboro, with a loss of about 200 men in casualties of 600 engaged. The regiment wintered at Tullahoma, and was with the army when it fell back. Now under Gen. Deas as brigadier, the regiment moved to the assault at Chicamauga about 500 strong, of which about one-fifth were killed or wounded. It was in the line at Mission Ridge, and lost about 45 men, mostly captured. On the retreat from Dalton, where it had wintered, the regiment performed arduous and active service, fighting nearly every day. In the bloody battles around Atlanta the regiment lost very heavily, but at Jonesboro the list of casualties was small. It then moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and was badly mutilated at Franklin. The regiment subsequently proceeded to the Carolinas, and it was at Kinston that a line of skirmishers, 40 strong, principally from it, under Captain E.B. Vaughan, captured a stand of colors and 300 men of the 15th Connecticut. The Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth laid down its arms at Greenesboro, N.C., with Gen. Johnston's forces.



Field and Staff

Colonel -- John G. Coltart of Madison; wounded at Shiloh and Atlanta.

Lieutenant Colonels -- Wm. D. Chaddick of Madison; resigned. Newton Nash Clements of Tuskaloosa.

Majors -- .... Gwin of Tennessee; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. N.N. Clements; promoted. Thomas H. Gilbert of Limestone; resigned. John C. Hutto of Walker.

Adjutant -- John C. Bruckner of Madison; killed at Atlanta.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Calhoun -- .... Sappington; resigned. T.T. Lankford; retired. Martin Walker.

Limestone -- T.H. Gilbert; promoted. J. Archie Ray.

Jackson -- Lemuel G. Meade; resigned. James E. Daniel.

Blount -- George Arnold; killed at Atlanta. John Elrod.

Limestone -- James H. Malone; resigned. John B. McClellan; transferred. William Richardson.

Tuskaloosa -- N.N. Clements; promoted. John D. Burgin.

Walker and Fayette -- John C. Clemons; resigned. E. B. Vaughan.

Walker -- John C. Hutto; promoted.

Lauderdale -- John C. Haynie; resigned. Robert Donald.

Walker and Fayette -- ...... Wooten; resigned. John B. McClellan.


26th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Tuscumbia in the summer of 1861, and soon after went to Virginia. It was in camp of instruction at Richmond during the fall and winter, and in March 1862 was moved to Yorktown, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Rains of Tennessee. It was under fire there for six weeks, with few casualties. Gen. Jos. E. Johnston led the regiment into position at Williamsburg, where its loss was inconsiderable. At Richmond it was placed in the brigade of Gen. Rodes of Tuskaloosa - shortly after re-organized so as to embrace the Third, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments - and lost 22 per cent of its numbers in casualties at Seven Pines. The Twenty-sixth was also hotly engaged at Gaines' Mill, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, emerging from the effects of those terrible struggles with only 300 of the 600 with which it entered, the others having gone down in the carnage of battle. The regiment was in the van of the army as it moved over the Potomac and fought at Boonsboro and Sharpsburg, losing in those two battles 10 killed and 45 wounded. Having wintered on the Rappahannock, the Twenty-sixth was present at Fredericksburg. In the grand advance of Jackson's corps at Chancellorsville - Col. O'Neal leading the brigade - the regiment lost very heavily, but its colors floated at the front. It then moved into Pennsylvania, and took part in the battle of Gettysburg, with a loss of 7 killed, 58 wounded, and 65 missing. Retiring with the army into Virginia, the Twenty-sixth skirmished at Kelly's Ford and Mine Run. During the winter, the Alabama legislature petitioned to have the regiment sent home to recruit its thinned ranks, and it remained a short time at Pollard. Ordered to Dalton in the spring of 1864, it was placed in Cantey's brigade, and lost gradually but largely in the almost incessant battle from Dalton to Atlanta. Having marched with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, the regiment was badly cut up at Nashville, and only a remnant surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina, to which place it had been transferred with the forces.




Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. R. Smith of Tuskaloosa; resigned. E.A. O'Neal; wounded at Seven Pines, Boonsboro, Chancellorsville.

Lieutenant Colonel - John S. Garvin of Tuskaloosa; wounded at Chancellorsville and Franklin.

Majors - R.D. Reddin of Fayette; resigned. D.F. Bryan of Fayette.

Adjutant - S.B. Moore of Madison.




Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Fayette - .... Moore; resigned. E.M. Vandiver; wounded at Chancellorsville.

Fayette - .... Newton; resigned. J.M. Harton.

Fayette - D.M. Gideon.

Fayette - H.H. Reid; resigned. Sidney B. Smith.

Marion - D.F. Bryan; promoted. E.M. Turner.

Marion - .... Lefoy.

Marion - J.S. White; resigned. J.W. White.

Fayette - W.H. Lindsey.

Fayette - Elbert Leach.

F.M. Smith, Captain of Sharpshooters.


25th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Mobile in December 1861 by the consolidation of two battalions. It remained in that vicinity under Gen. Gladden, the regiment fought at Shiloh, where its casualties were 15 killed and 75 wounded. Placed under Gen. Gardner, with the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, the Twenty-fifth met with trifling loss at Farmington. It moved into Kentucky with Gen. Bragg from the Chattanooga base, but was not engaged in any action. It came back, and participated at Murfreesboro - Col. Loomis commanding the brigade - with a loss of 13 killed, 88 wounded, and 16 missing, out of about 250 present for duty. The regiment - Gen. Deas in command of the brigade - fell back with the army, and was fearfully mutilated. It again suffered severely at Missionary Ridge, but wintered and recruited at Dalton. All along the bloody track of the hostile armies through north Georgia, the Twenty-fifth left a record, especially at New Hope. At Atlanta, July 22, the regiment lost 49 per cent of its force, but captured two stands of colors, and more prisoners than it numbered. Six days later, near the same spot, the Twenty-fifth again lost very heavily. It was engaged at Jonesboro without severe loss, but suffered considerably at Columbia, on Hood's arrival in middle Tennessee. At Franklin the regiment again lost largely, and at Nashville its loss was not light, but it preserved its organization on the retreat. Proceeding to the Carolinas, the Twenty-fifth was in Sherman's front, with some casualties at Columbia and Kinston, and with large loss at Bentonville. Consolidated with the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, the regiment was shortly after surrendered at Goldsboro, having about 75 men of the old Twenty-fifth present for duty.



Field and Staff

Colonels - John Q. Loomis of Coosa; wounded at Shiloh and Murfreesboro; resigned. Geo. D. Johnston; promoted.

Lieutenant Colonels - Wm. B. McClellan of Talladega; resigned; George D. Johnston; promoted.

Major - George D. Johnston of Perry; promoted.

Adjutant - John Stout of Coosa; wounded at Murfreesboro, Atlanta and Franklin.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Covington - M. Harper; killed at Shiloh. Charles Corege; resigned. Bushrod W. Bell.

Pike - John B. Curtis; resigned. N.B. Rouse.

Shelby - WileyPope; resigned. Lieut. Pledger commanded.

St. Clair - A.W. Nixon; resigned. H. Lewis Morris; wounded and captured at Murfreesboro; wounded at New Hope and Franklin.

Pickens - D.M. Richards; wounded and captured at Mission Ridge.

Randolph - Wm. A. Handley; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. F.M. Handley; wounded at Franklin.

Talladega - Joseph D. McCann; resigned. Archibald A. Patterson; killed at Murfreesboro. Silas P. Bradford.

Talladega and St. Clair - Edmund Turner; resigned. William Spruce; wounded at Chicamauga.

Coffee and Pike - D.P. Costello; wounded at Shiloh; killed at Murfreesboro. Dan'l C. Monroe; wounded at Chicamauga.

Calhoun - Mathew Alexander; resigned. W.B. Howell; wounded at Atlanta and Bentonville.


Sunday, August 14, 2011

Commanders in Chief of the United Confederate Veterans, 1889-1951.

Commanders in Chief of the United Confederate Veterans
  • John B. Gordon 1889-1904
  • Stephen D. Lee 1904-1908
  • W.L. Cabell 1908-1909
  • Clem A. Evans 1909-1911
  • George W. Gordon 1911-1912
  • C.I. Walker 1912-1913
  • Bennett H. Young 1913-1916
  • George P. Harrison 1916-1919
  • K.M. Van Zandt 1919-1921
  • Julian S. Carr 1921-1923
  • Wm. B. Halderman 1923-1924
  • James A. Thomas 1924-1925
  • Walker B. Freeman 1925-1926
  • M.D. Vance 1926-1927
  • J.C. Foster 1927-1928
  • Albert T. Goodwyn 1928-1929
  • Richard A. Sneed 1929-1930
  • Len W. Stephens 1930-1931
  • Charles A. DeSaussure 1931-1932
  • Homer T. Atkinson 1932-1934
  • Rice A. Pierce 1934-1935
  • Harry R. Lee 1935-1936
  • Homer T. Atkinson 1936-1937
  • John M. Claypool 1937-1938
  • John W. Harris 1938-1939
  • Julius F. Howell 1939-1941
  • John M. Claypool 1941-1942
  • John W. Harris 1942-1943
  • Homer T. Atkinson 1943-1945
  • William Banks 1945-1946
  • William Henry Taylor Dowling 1946-1947
  • James W. Moore 1947-1948
  • Wm. M. Buck 1948-1949
  • James W. Moore 1949-1951

Sunday, July 31, 2011

24th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Mobile in August 1861, and remained at Fort Morgan till April 1862. It then moved to Corinth, and was brigaded under Gen. J.K. Jackson of Georgia. The regiment was first under fire at Blackland and Farmington, with trifling loss. It shared the privations of the Kentucky campaign, but was not engaged. Placed in the brigade of Gen. Manigault of South Carolina, with the Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fourth Alabama, and two South Carolina regiments, the Twenty-fourth took part at Murfreesboro, where it lost about 100 killed and wounded. It moved back with the army to the line of the Chattanooga. In the grand forward movement at Chicamauga, the regiment bore its flag "high and haughtily in the face of Death," and lost 200 killed and wounded. It was engaged at Mission Ridge, with about 25 casualties. Having wintered at Dalton, the regiment fought all the way down from Crow Valley to Jonesboro, losing about 300 men, principally in the casualties of battle. With the army, the Twenty-fourth moved into Tennessee, and was engaged at Columbia, Franklin, and Nashville, but without severe loss in either. The regiment was part of the army that proceeded to the Carolinas, and was in the fight at Salisbury. Just before the surrender, it was consolidated with the Twenty-eight and Thirty-fourth Alabama regiments, with J.C. Carter of Montgomery as colonel, Starke H. Oliver of Mobile as lieutenant colonel, and P.G. Wood of Dallas as major. At the time of the surrender, near High Point, N.C., it was in Sharp's brigade, of D.H. Hill's division, S.D. Lee's corps, and numbered about 150 men.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. A. Buck of Mobile; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. Newton N. Davis of Pickens; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - Wm. M. LeBaron of Mobile; resigned. Wm. B. Dennet of Mobile; resigned. N.N. Davis; promoted. B.F. Sawyer of Talladega; retired. George A. Jennison of Mobile.

Majors - Wm. B. Dennet; promoted. Newton N. Davis; promoted. Junius J. Pierce of Shelby.

Adjutants - George A. Jennison; promoted. George B. Enholm of Mobile.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - W.B. Smith; killed at Murfreesboro. Bart. S. Chamberlain; wounded at Chicamauga. D.P. Berry.

Mobile - Bernard O'Connel; resigned. Wm. J. O'Brien; killed at Chicamauga; R.T.B. Parham; detached.

Shelby - Junius J. Pierce; promoted. Hubbel Pierce; wounded at Atlanta.

Mobile - George M. Bonner; till re-organized. Starke H. Oliver; wounded at Atlanta.

Clarke - Dan'l McLeod; till reorganized. Thos. I. Kimball.

Mobile - John D. Fowler; resigned. W.P. Fowler; wounded at Atlanta.

Mobile - Alphonse Hurtel; detached. Lieut. Wm. H. Higley commanded.

Pickens - N.N. Davis; promoted. W.J. McCracken; wounded at Atlanta. Lieut. W.B. Dunlap commanded.

Mobile - James Hooper; till re-organized. John B. Hazard; wounded and captured at Mission Ridge; died at Johnson's Island. Lieut. John M. Nettles commanded.

Talladega and Shelby - Benjamin F. Sawyer; promoted. James Hall; wounded at Bentonville.


23rd Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment organized at Montgomery, Nov. 19, 1861. Ordered shortly after, to Mobile, it was attached to General Gladden's brigade, and remained there till the following February. During a stay there of two months the regiment lost 82 men by disease. It then moved into east Tennessee, and was first brigaded under Gen. Leadbetter of Mobile, afterwards under Gen. Barton of Tennesee, and in June 1862 under Col. Taylor of Kentucky. The Twenty-third performed much arduous duty in east Tennessee, and formed part of Stephenson's division, Kirby Smith's corps, in the Kentucky campaign. When the army returned to Tennessee, a brigade was formed of the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, Thirth-first, and Forty-sixth Alabama regiments, and placed under Gen. Tracy of Madison. In December 1862, with Stephenson's division, the Twenty-third was moved to Vicksburg, and a few days later was present at the fight at Chicasa Bayou. It was hotly engaged at Port Gibson, where the brigade commander fell, and lost heavily there in killed and wounded, and captured. Gen. S.D. Lee then took command of the brigade. At Baker's Creek the Twenty-third was engaged, and lost a number captured. The next day it was in the fight at Big Black bridge, and when the army fell back, the regiment was left, by oversight, and for twelve hours resisted the whole federal army, without severe loss. Retiring into Vicksburg, the regiment shared in that siege, fighting day and night, but without many casualties. Paroled immediately, the regiment was soon exchanged, and joined the Army of Tennessee just after the battle of Chicamauga, Gen. Pettus of Dallas commanding the brigade. The Twenty-third took part at Mission Ridge with light loss, and wintered at Dalton. At the beginning of the campaign, it suffered heavy loss at Resaca, but was constantly in front of Sherman all the way down the bloody path to Atlanta and Jonesboro, suffering very severely in the latter battle. The regiment marched with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, was engaged at Columbia with considerable loss, and at Nashville, where many of the men were captured. It guarded the rear of the retreating army, and moved into the Carolinas. From Branchville to Bentonville it fought Sherman, and was consolidated with the Forty-sixth Alabama, with J.B. Bibb as colonel, Osceola Kyle of Coosa as lieutenant colonel, and J.T. Hester as major, and surrendered at Salisbury, North Carolina. Nearly 1200 names were on the rolls of the Twenty-third; it had 436 muskets at Rocky-face, and 76 surrendered at Salisbury, under Col. Bibb.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Franklin K. Beck of Wilcox; captured at Vicksburg; killed at Resaca. Joseph B. Bibb of Montgomery; wounded at Nashville.

Lieut. Colonels - Jos. B. Bibb of Montgomery; promoted.

Majors - Felix Tait of Wilcox; resigned. John J. Longmire of Monroe; resigned. F. McMurray of Macon; wounded at Mission Ridge; retired. A.C. Roberts of Marengo; killed at New Hope. J.T. Hester of Montgomery.

Adjutants - Henry Goldthwaite of Mobile; resigned. J. T. Norman of Macon; captured at Port Gibson. William Beard of Conecuh.



Captains, and counties from Which the Companies Came.

Wilcox - J.J. Longmire; promoted. G.H. Moye; resigned. W.P. Steen; captured at Vicksburg; wounded at Atlanta.

Macon - F. McMurray; wounded and captured at Port Gibson; promoted. F. Rutherford; killed at Jonesboro. Lieut. Carnie Leslie commanded.

Marengo - A.L. Norwood; resigned. A.C. Roberts; promoted. Robert Chapman.

Conecuh - D.K. Smith; resigned. J.T. Hester; promoted. James M. Anderson.

Monroe - G.G. Mathews; resigned. H.M. Graham; captured at Vicksburg.

Lowndes - Henry P. Reid; resigned. S. Oliver Merriwether; captured at Port Gibson.

Chocta - J.G. Yates; resigned. John Stevens; killed at Port Gibson. F. Butterfield; killed at Atlanta.

Conecuh - T.B. McCall; resigned. B.L. Selman; captured at Vicksburg; wounded at Resaca; Lieut. McDonald commanded.

Baldwin - R.Y. Rew; resigned. W.H. Miles; captured at Vicksburg.

Wilcox and Clarke - Wm. E. Powe; resigned. Greene D. McConnell; captured at Vicksburg.


22nd Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Twenty-second was organized at Montgomery in November 1861, and was encamped at Mobile during the winter. Ordered to west Tennessee, and brigaded under Gen. Gladden of Louisiana, the regiment was engaged at Shiloh with very heavy loss. After that battle, Gen. Frank Gardner was placed over the brigade - Nineteenth, Twent-second, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, and Thirty-ninth Alabama regiments - and led it into Kentucky. It was present at Mumfordsville, and skirmished at Perryville. It came back with the army, and fought at Murfreesboro with severe loss. Gen. Deas then assumed command of the brigade. The regiment was in the splendid line of battle which moved to the assault of Rosecrans' army at Chicamauga, and lost five color-bearers, and 175 killed and wounded out of about 400 men. The Twenty-second suffered lightly at Mission Ridge, and wintered at Dalton. It participated in the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, losing gradually by the constant fighting, the brigade being under Gen. Johnston of Perry a short time. At Atlanta, July 22nd and 28th the loss of the regiment was quite severe, and large at Jonesboro. It moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and suffered severely at Franklin, and lightly at Nashville. Transferred beyond the Edisto, the Twenty-second moved into North Carolina, skirmishing with the advance of Thomas' army. The loss at Kinston and Bentonville was light, Colonel Toulmin leading the brigade. Consolidated with the Twenty-fifth, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, at Smithville, with H.T. Toulmin as colonel, N.B. Rouse of Butler as lieutenant colonel, and Robert Donald of Limestone as major, the regiment laid down its arms at Greenesboro, N.C., April 1865.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Zach C. Deas of Mobile; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. John C. Marrast of Mobile; died in the service. Benjamin R. Hart of Montgomery; killed near Atlanta. Harry T. Toulmin of Mobile.

Lieutenant Colonels - John C. Marrast; promoted. John Weedon of Mobile; killed at Chicamauga. Benj. R. Hart; promoted. Harry T. Toulmin; promoted. E. Herbert Armstead of Mobile; killed at Franklin.

Majors - Robert Beverly Armstead of Mobile; killed at Shiloh. John Weedon; promoted. B.R. Hart; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted. H.T. Toulmin; promoted. E. H. Armstead; promoted. Thomas McC. Prince, Jr. of Chocta; wounded at Franklin.

Adjutants - Elias F. Travis of Mobile; wounded at Shiloh; transferred. Wm. G. Smith of Mobile; resigned. J.L. Lockwood of Montgomery; wounded at Jonesboro.



Field and Staff

Walker - John Weedon; promoted. J.M. Whitney.

Chocta - Abner C. Gaines; killed at Shiloh. Thos. McC. Prince, Jr.; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted.

Clarke - James Deas Nott; killed at Chicamauga. Joseph R. Cowan; wounded near Marietta.

Cherokee - Stephen R. Hood; resigned. E.H. Armstead; promoted. Thomas M. Brindley; killed near Atlanta. Lieut. King commanded.

Calhoun - J.R. Northcutt; resigned. Jacob G. Mordecai.

Randolph - A.B. Shepher; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. James B. Martin.

Mobile - Harry T. Toulmin; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. S. Franklin Preston.

Pike - A.P. Love; wounded at Shiloh; retired. Willis C. Wood; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. W.H. Henderson; wounded at Kinston.

Montgomery and Pike - B.R. Hart; promoted. Hugh W. Henry.


Thursday, July 28, 2011

21st Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Twenty-first was mustered into service Oct. 13, 1861, at Mobile, and remained at Hall's Mill and Fort Gaines till ordered to Fort Pillow in March 1862. It remained there a few days, then moved to Corinth, where it was brigaded under Gen. Gladden. The regiment took part in the battle of Shiloh, where it lost six color-bearers in succession, and 200 killed and wounded out of about 650 engaged and was complimented in general orders. On the return to Corinth, the regiment was reorganized, and extended their enlistment from one year to "for the war." The Twenty-first was at Farmington, but its casualties were few. In the summer the regiment was ordered to Mobile, and was on garrison duty at Fort Morgan, and at Oven and Chocta Bluffs.* It was at Pollard a short time under Gen. Cantey, but was then ordered to the defenses of Mobile. Two companies were stationed at Fort Powell, where, with a loss of one killed, they withstood a bombardment of a fortnight from five gun-boats and six mortar-boats which attempted to force an entrance through Grant's Pass. Six companies of the regiment were captured at Fort Gaines, and two at Fort Morgan; but the two at Fort Powell blew up and evacuated the post. The men captured at Fort Gaines were exchanged, the others were not. The remainder of the regiment were part of the garrison of Spanish Fort, where it lost about 10 killed and 25 wounded. The Twenty-first was surrendered at Cuba, in Sumter, May 6, 1865, about 250 strong. It is but just to say that the Twenty-first was composed largely of artisans from Mobile, many of whom were detached to assist in the various government works.



Field and Staff

Colonels - James Crawford of Mobile; resigned. Charles D. Anderson of Mobile; captured at Fort Gaines.

Lieutenant Colonels - A.J. Ingersoll of Mobile; resigned. Stewart W. Cayce of Mobile; resigned. Charles S. Stewart of Mobile; killed at Fort Morgan. J.M. Williams of Mobile.

Majors - Frederick Stewart of Mobile; till re-organized. Jas. M. Williams; promoted. Chas. B. Johnson of Mobile.

Adjutants - S.W. Cayce; promoted. James M. Williams; transferred to line. George Vidmer of Mobile; wounded at Spanish Fort.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - John F. Jewett; till re-organization. James M. Williams; promoted. Jno. F. Cothran; captured at Ft. Morgan.

Mobile - Charles B. Johnson; promoted. John O'Connor; captured at Fort Gaines.

Marengo - J.M. Rembert; wounded at Shiloh; died in the service. F. Smith; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - Cary W. Butt; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. Melville C. Butt.

Marengo - John C. Chamberlain; resigned. Henry Sosaman; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile and Baldwin - F.J. McCoy; till re-organized. B. F. Dade; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - S.S. Taylor; died in the service. Murdock McInnis; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - Charles Devaux. Angelo Festorazzi. (Companies transferred to the First Louisiana.)

Mobile - Charles S. Stewart; promoted. A.P. Doran; captured at Fort Morgan; resigned. C. LeBaron Collins; captured at Fort Morgan.

(Conscripts) 1862 - A.S. Carrington; captured at Ft. Gaines.

(Conscripts) 1862 - Edw. Spalding; captured at Ft. Gaines.


*It was while the regiment lay at Mobile that a sub-marine boat was constructed to operate against the blockading squadron. After ten or fifteen men had been lost by the sudden sinking of the vessel, Lieut. George E. Dixon, of Capt. Cothran's company, with several of his men, volunteered to man it. But the current at the entrance of the bay was too strong, and Dixon and his men accompanied it to Charleston. There it went to sea one night, and blew up the Housatonic, of the federal blockading squadron, causing her to sink, with all her crew. The fate of Dixon and his men was not known till after the peace, when his boat was found by the side of the Housatonic, and in its air-tight walls were encoffined the skeletons of the brave crew. Dixon was a Kentuckian by birth and an engineer by profession.

20th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, Sept. 16, 1861, and proceeded to Mobile in November. In February 1862 it went to Knoxville, and was placed under Gen. Leadbetter of Mobile. Transferred to Barton's brigade, the Twentieth operated for some time in east Tennessee, and advanced into Kentucky with Gen. Kirby Smith, being in Reynolds' brigade, Heth's division. It was in the pursuit of Gen. Sill on Salt river, and joined Gen. Bragg just after the battle of Perryville. The regiment was in Col. T.H. Taylor's brigade for a short time, but shortly after the return to Tennessee a brigade of Alabamians was organized - the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Forty-sixth regiments - and placed under Gen. Tracy of Madison, and in Stevenson's division. A few days prior to the battle of Murfreesboro, the division was sent to Vicksburg, and the regiment fought at Port Gibson the following spring, losing heavily in casualties. At Baker's Creek it again suffered severely, and was then pent up in Vicksburg. During that dreary siege the ranks of the Twentieth were greatly thinned, and it surrendered with the fortress. After the fall of Gen. Tracy at Port Gibson, Gen. S.D. Lee of South Carolina commanded the brigade, till Gen. Pettus of Dallas was placed over it in the parol camp at Demopolis. Ordered to join Gen. Bragg, the Twentieth participated in the battle of Mission Ridge without loss. The winter was passed at Dalton, and the regiment was engaged in the constant fighting from Dalton to Atlanta, being conspicuous at Rocky-face, and losing heavily at Kennesa. Its colors were borne through the iron hail at Jonesboro, and the remnant suffered severely. It moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost largely at Nashville. From that disastrous field the Twentieth passed into North Carolina, and fought at Kinston and Bentonville. It was surrendered at Salisbury - about 165 rank and file. Of the original 1100 men with which the Twentieth took the field, only 63 were present at Salisbury.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert T. Jones of Perry; transferred. Isham W. Garrot of Perry; promoted, but killed at Vicksburg in command of the regiment. Edmund W. Pettus of Dallas; promoted. Jas. M. Dedman of Dallas; wounded near Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - I.W. Garrot of Perry; promoted. E.W. Pettus; captured at Port Gibson, but escaped; promoted. James M. Dedman of Dallas; promoted. Mitchell T. Porter of Jefferson; resigned. John W. Davis of Shelby; wounded at Rocky- face, and Marietta.

Majors - E.W. Pettus; promoted. A.S. Pickering of Perry; killed at Port Gibson. James M. Dedman; promoted. M.T. Porter; promoted. John W. Davis; wounded at Marietta; promoted. John G. Harris of Greene.

Adjutants - John L. Smith of Dallas; promoted to the adjutancy of the brigade. Francis M. Vance of Dallas.



Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Perry - A.S. Pickering; promoted. Leroy E. Davis.

Dallas and Bibb - James M Dedman wounded at Vicksburg; promoted. Thomas K. Fergusson.

Jefferson - Mitchell T. Porter; promoted. Jack Ayres; killed at Jonesboro. Andrew J. Tarrant.

Bibb - R. Hobson Pratt;* captured at Port Gibson. Lieut. Wm. Lowery commanded.

Greene - .... Watkins; resigned. John McKee Gould; detailed on Gen. Pettus' staff. Lieut. J.S. Smith commanded.

Perry and Bibb - Lucius J. Lockett; resigned. W.H. Sheppard; resigned. Isaac W. Parrish.

Shelby, Bibb, and Jefferson - John W. Davis; promoted. R.M. Deshazo; resigned. Geo. S. Nave; wounded at Marietta.

Perry and Bibb - John P. Peterson; resigned. Samuel W. Davisdon.

Greene - John G. Harris; promoted. Albert Avery; resigned. Noah H. Gewin.

Tuskaloosa - Jos. C. Guild; resigned. Benj. Massingale.


*This officer remained in prison during the war, and was entitled to the lieutenant-colonelcy of the regiment over Col. Davis.

19th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Nineteenth was organized at Huntsville, August 14, 1861, and at once ordered to Mobile. It remained there about three months, then was at Pensacola a fortnight. Ordered to Corinth, the regiment was brigaded under General Gladden of Louisiana, with the Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments, to which the Thirty-ninth was added after the battle of Shiloh. In that battle the Nineteenth received its appalling baptism of blood, losing 110 killed and 240 wounded of the 650 that followed its colors into the action. Gen. Frank Gardner soon after succeeded to the command of the brigade, and led it into Kentucky, where it did not come in collision with the foe. It retired with the army, and fought at Murfreesboro with a loss of about one hundred killed and wounded, about one-fourth of its strength. Gen. Deas of Mobile succeeded to the command of the brigade, and led it at Chicamauga, where it again lost very heavily. The casualties were few at Mission Ridge, and the Nineteenth wintered at Dalton. In the almost cessant battle from that place to Atlanta, the regiment lost largely in casualties, particularly at New Hope and near Marietta. The brigade being under Gen. Johnston of Perry, the Nineteenth was badly cut up in the battles of July 22 and 28 at Atlanta. It suffered lightly at Jonesboro, but having followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, the Nineteenth lost severely in prisoners at Franklin, with few casualties. It went to North Carolina, and was engaged at Kinston and Bentonville, losing largely in the latter battle. Consolidated with the Fortieth and the Forty-sixth Alabama regiments at Salisbury (with M.L. Woods of Montgomery as colonel, and Ezekiel Gully of Sumter as lieutenant colonel), the Nineteenth surrendered at that place, 76 strong.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Joseph Wheeler of Georgia; promoted. Samuel K. McSpadden of Cherokee; captured at Resaca.

Lieutenant Colonels - Edw. D. Tracy of Madison; promoted to brigadier general. Geo. R. Kimbrough of Pickens.

Majors - Samuel K. McSpadden; promoted. George R. Kimbrough; promoted. Solomon Palmer of Blount.

Adjutants - Clifton Walker of Madison; wounded at Shiloh; transferred to Gen. Tracy's staff. C.G. Hale; wounded at Murfreesboro.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Pickens - George R. Kimbrough; promoted. R.J. Healy; killed at Murfreesboro. Dyer C. Hodo; wounded at Atlanta.

Blount - Wm. D. McKenzie; killed at Corinth. H.L. Houston; killed at Atlanta.

Jefferson - Wm. F. Hamby; wounded at Shiloh. Lieut. Rouse commanded.

Cherokee - Wm. P. Hollingsworth; transferred to General Tracy's staff. Ed. Thornton; killed at Jonesboro.

Cherokee - Rufus B. Rhea; wounded at Chicamauga.

Cherokee - Wm. E. Kirkpatrick; resigned. Marvel Israel; wounded at Chicamauga; retired. Thomas B. Williamson; wounded at Atlanta.

Cherokee - Jackson Millsap; resigned. John N. Barry; retired. James H. Leath; wounded at Atlanta.

Cherokee - J.L. Cunningham; transferred to Gen. Tracy's staff. Samuel B. Echols.

Cherokee - James H. Savage.

Blunt - J.H. Skinner; resigned. Solomon Palmer; promoted. Nathan J. Venable; killed at Marietta. Jas. K. Duffie.


18th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Auburn, Sept. 4, 1861, and the field officers were appointed by President Davis. A few weeks later, it went to Mobile, by way of Huntsville, and was there brigaded under Gen. Gladden of Louisiana, with the Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-second, and Twenty-fifth Alabama regiments, Withers' division. Ordered to Corinth in March 1862, the regiment was there brigaded under Gen. J.K. Jackson of Georgia, with the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Alabama regiments. The Eighteenth fought the first day at Shiloh, and lost 125 killed and wounded out of 420 men engaged. It was detailed to escort the brigade of Gen. Prentiss, which it had largely aided to capture, to the rear, and did not take part the second day. After the battle, the regiment being withouth field officers, was for a short time under officers detailed for the purpose. It was under fire at Blackland, and soon after was sent to Mobile. There the Eighteenth remained till April 1863, when it rejoined the army of Tennessee, in a brigade with the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-eight Alabama regiments, and the Ninth Alabama battalion (the latter being soon after raised to the Fifty-eighth regiment, and consolidated subsequently with the Thirty-second Alabama), commanded successively by Generals Cummings of Georgia, Clayton of Barbour, Holtzclaw of Montgomery, and Colonel Bush Jones of Perry. At Chicamauga the Eighteenth was terribly mutilated, losing 22 out of 36 officers, and 300 out of 500 men, killed and wounded. At Mission Ridge the Eighteenth was engaged, and lost about 90 men, principally captured. Having wintered at Dalton, it began the Dalton-Atlanta campaign with 500 effective men, and fought all the way down to Jonesboro, losing constantly in killed and wounded, but with no severe loss at any one place. It lost very nearly half its number during the campaign, and rendered effective service. The regiment went with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and lost about 100 at Franklin, principally captured. When the army moved to the Carolinas in February 1865, the regiment was ordered to Mobile, and placed in the field works at Spanish Fort. It participated prominently in the siege of that place several weeks later, with some loss, and escaped when the defences were evacuated. It surrendered at Meridian, Miss., May 4, 1865, with the military department.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Edward C. Bullock of Barbour; died in service. Eli S. Shorter of Barbour; resigned. James T. Holtzclaw of Montgomery; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted. Peter F. Hunley of Shelby.

Lieutenant Colonels - Eli S. Shorter; promoted. J.T. Holtzclaw; wounded at Shiloh; promoted; Richard F. Inge of Greene; killed at Chicamauga. Peter F. Hunley; promoted. Shep. Ruffin of Pike; promoted.

Adjutants - B.W. Starke of Pike; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. John P.C. Whitehead of Georgia; transferred. R.P. Baker of Mobile.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.



Coffee - William M. Moxley; resigned. B.W. Starke; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. Joseph Justice; killed at Chicamauga. Noah Hutchinson.

Covington - James Brady; resigned. O.A. Stringer; killed at Chicamauga. Thomas Hardwick.

Jefferson - James Oliver; resigned. James McLaughlin.

Coosa - Guy Smith; resigned. Charles M. Cox; resigned. W.H. Hammond; killed at Chicamauga. George M. Williams; wounded at Chicamauga; captured at Franklin.

Tuskaloosa - Richard F. Inge; promoted. S.K. Wilkerson; captured at Mission Ridge.

Butler - H. Clay Armstrong; resigned. Aug. C. Greene; wounded at Jonesboro.

Jefferson - James Haughey; resigned. H.P. Walker.

Pike - Shep. Ruffin; promoted. S.K. Fielder; killed at Chicamauga. J.B. Darby; wounded at New Hope.

Shelby - Peter F. Hunley; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. J.M. Mickle; killed at Chicamauga. .... Martin.

Talladega - John Calhoun; resigned. H. Clay Stone; wounded at Chicamauga; detached. Thomas M. Riser.


17th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Montgomery in August 1861. In November it moved to Pensacola, and was present at the bombardment in that month, and in January after. In March 1862 the regiment was sent to west Tennessee. Brigaded under J.K. Jackson of Georgia - with the Eighteenth, Twenty-first, and Twenty-fourth Alabama regiments - the regiment fought at Shiloh, and lost 125 killed and wounded. A month after, it was in the fight at Farmington with few casualties. In the autumn, when Gen. Bragg moved into Kentucky, the Seventeenth, much depleted by sickness, was left at Mobile. It was there drilled as heavy artillery, and had charge of eight batteries on the shore of the bay. It remained at that post till March 1864, when it was ordered to Rome, Ga. The brigade consisted of the Seventeenth and Twenty-ninth Alabama, and the First and Twenty-sixth Alabama, and Thirty-seventh Mississippi, were soon after added, the command devolving at different times on Gen. Cantey of Russell, Col. Murphey of Montgomery, Col. O'Neal of Lauderdale, and Gen. Shelley of Talladega. It was engaged at the Oostenaula bridge, and in the three days' battle of Resaca, with severe loss. The Seventeenth had its full share of the trials and hardships of the campaign from Dalton to Jonesboro, fighting almost daily, especially at Cassville, New Hope, Kennesa, Lost Mountain, and Atlanta. In the battle of Peach-tree Creek it lost 130 killed and wounded, and on the 28th of July 180 killed and wounded. The entire loss from the Resaca to Lovejoy's Station was 586, but few of whom were captured. The regiment moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost at least two-thirds of its forces engaged at Franklin; and a number of the remainder were captured at Nashville. A remnant moved into North Carolina, and a part fought at Bentonville. It was then consolidated with the Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Alabama regiments, with E.P. Holcombe of Lowndes as colonel, J.F. Tate of Russell lieutenant colonel, and Willis J. Milner of Butler major. The regiment surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. April 1865.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Thomas H. Watts of Montgomery; resigned. R.C. Fariss of Montgomery; resigned. Virgil S. Murphey of Montgomery; captured at Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - R.C. Fariss; promoted. Virgil S. Murphey; promoted. Edward P. Holcombe of Lowndes; wounded at Resaca.

Majors - Virgil S. Murphey; promoted. Thomas J. Burnett of Butler; wounded at Atlanta.

Adjutants - W.M. Moon of Lowndes; resigned. S.J. Cumming of Monroe.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lowndes - E.P. Holcombe; promoted. C.E. Saddler; wounded at Shiloh.

Butler - J. Dean; resigned. James S. Moreland; captured at Resaca.

Butler - W.D. Perryman; resigned. John Bolling; captured at Nashville.

Coosa - Thomas C. Bragg; resigned. John A. Hester; captured near Atlanta.

Randolph - Wiley E. White; captured at Huntsville.

Montomery - Andrew L. O'Brien; wounded at Atlanta.

Russell - Thos. Ragland; killed at Atlanta. John F. Tate.

Monroe - W.W. McMillan; wounded and taken at Franklin.

Pike - A.M. Collins; resigned. J.L. Bones; wounded at Atlanta.

Butler - T.J. Burnett; promoted. T.A. McCane.


16th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Sixteenth was organized at Courtland, August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. B. Wood of Lauderdale; transferred. A.H. Helvenston of Marion; resigned. Frederick A. Ashford of Lawrence; killed at Nashville.

Lieutenant Colonels - John W. Harris of Franklin; resigned. A.H. Helvenston; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. Jas. McGaughey of Franklin; killed at Chicamauga.

Majors - A.H. Helvenston; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. James McGaughey; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. F.A. Ashford; promoted.

Adjutant - Brice Wilson of Franklin; killed at Franklin.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lauderdale - Alexander D. Coffee; resigned. Oliver S. Kennedy; resigned. Calvin Carson.

Franklin - Jas. M'Gaughey; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. Barton Dickson; wounded at Chicamauga and at New Hope.

Franklin - James W.C. Smith; resigned. Johm Beene; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Franklin - W.W. Weatherford; resigned. John Beene; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Lawrence - Frederick A. Ashford; promoted. Frederick Sherrod; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Lawrence - William Hodges; wounded at Chicamauga.

Marion - John B. Powers; resigned. John H. Bankhead; wounded.

Lawrence - William S. Bankhead; resigned. Lafayette Swope; resigned. Robert McGregor; killed at Nashville.

Marion - George W. Archer; wounded at Atlanta.

Conecuh - J.J. May.


15th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment organized at Fort Mitchell in the summer of 1861, and moved at once into Virginia. Joining the main army near Manassas, it was brigaded with the 21st Georgia, 21st N. Carolina, and 16th Mississippi, under Gen. G.B. Crittenden of Kentucky; Gen I.R. Trimble succeeding Crittenden in December. When the army moved over to Yorktown, the Fifteenth remained on the Shenandoah, in Gen. T.J. Jackson's division. It was engaged with slight loss at Front Royal and Winchester, but lost 9 killed and 33 wounded, out of 425, at Cross Keys. Moving over to Richmond, in Jackson's flank movement on McClellan, it entered the first battle of Cold Harbor with 412 men, and lost 34 killed and 110 wounded. Five days after, it suffered lightly at Malvern Hill. On the march in Maryland, it was engaged at Hazel River and Manassas Junction with a loss of 6 killed and 22 wounded. A day or two later the Fifteenth participated in the second and greater battle of Manassas, losing 21 killed and 91 wounded out of 440 men engaged. At Chantilly the regiment lost 4 killed and 14 wounded, and took part in the investment of Harper's Ferry, with trivial loss. At Sharpsburg, of 300 engaged, 9 were killed and 75 wounded. Under fire at Fredericksburg, the casualties were one killed and 34 wounded. The Fifteenth was then placed in a brigade uner Gen. Law (with the Fourth, Forty-fourth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Alabama regiments), Longstreet's corps. At Suffolk it lost 4 killed and 18 wounded. It took part in the grand assault of Hood's division on Gettysburg, and within a few minutes lost 72 killed, 190 wounded, and 81 missing, out of 644 men engaged. The Fifteenth suffered lightly at Battle Mountain, and, transferred to the West, bore its colors proudly at Chicamauga, where it lost 19 killed and 123 wounded, out of 425 engaged. In the fierce fights at Brown's Ferry and Lookout Valley, the regiment lost 15 killed and 40 wounded. Six killed and 21 wounded at Knoxville, and light loss at Bean's Station, closed the operations of the regiment in Tennessee. It took 450 men in at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and lost 18 killed and 48 wounded. At Hanover Junction and the second Cold Harbor the loss was 6 killed and 16 wounded, and then the regiment took its place in the "last ditch" at Petersburg. At Deep Bottom a third of its 275 men present were killed or wounded, and at Fussell's Mill the loss was 13 killed and 90 wounded. The Fifteenth took part in the subsequent severe fighting, and surrendered at Appomattox 170 strong. Of 1633 on the rolls, over 260 fell in battle, 440 died in the service, and 231 were transferred or discharged.



Field and Staff

Colonels - James Cantey of Russell; promoted. John F. Treutlen of Barbour; resigned. William C. Oates of Henry; wounded at Brown's Ferry. A.A. Lowther of Russell; wounded at Fussell's Mill.

Lieutenant Colonels - J.F. Treutlen; promoted. Isaac B. Feagan of Barbour; wounded at Gettysburg; retired.

Majors - J.W.L. Daniel of Barbour; resigned. A.A. Lowther; wounded at Wilderness; promoted.

Adjutants - Locke Weems of Russell; transferred to line. DeB. Waddell; transferred to line.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Russell - A.A. Lowther; promoted. Locke Weems; mortally wounded at Gaines' Mill. F.K. Shaaf.

Barbour - Isaac B. Feagan; promoted. R.A. Wright; wounded at second Manassas; retired. Noah B. Feagan.

Macon - Peter V. Guerry; killed at first Cold Harbor. J. H. Ellison; killed at Gettysburg; .... Guerry.

Barbour - .... Worthington; died in the sevice. B.A. Hill; killed at Fussell's Mill.

Dale - E. Brooks; resigned. W.A. Edwards; resigned. G.A.C. Mathews; wounded near Richmond; retired. .... Glover; killed at Petersburg.

Pike - B.F. Lewis; resigned. Geo. Y. Malone; wounded at first Cold Harbor; retired. DeKalb Williams.

Henry - W.C. Oates; promoted. Henry C. Brainard; killed at Gettysburg. John A. Oates; died of wounds received at Gettysburg. DeB. Waddell.

Barbour and Dale - W.N. Richardson; captured in east Tennessee. Benjamin Gardner; resigned.

Pike - Frank Park; killed at Knoxville. W.H. Strickland; wounded at Fussell's Mill.

Barbour - Henry C. Hart; transferred to department duty. W.J. Bethune; wounded at Gettysburg.

Pike (March 1862) - .... Hill; killed at Cross Keys. Lee Bryan; wounded at first Cold Harbor; retired. Jas. Hatcher.


Tuesday, July 26, 2011

14th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Auburn, August 1, 1861. It went first to Huntsville, thence to Virginia, where it arrived in November. Proceeding to Yorktown, it was brigaded under Gen. Pryor of Virginia, Longstreet's division. The command fell back with the army, and fought at Williamsburg with heavy loss to four of the companies. At Seven Pines it was again in action, with but few casualties. It participated at Mechanicsville, and was almost annihilated at Frazier's Farm and Malvern Hill, losing nearly all the officers, after charging the enemy's almost impregnable positions repeatedly. It moved towards the Potomac with the army, and was engaged with slight loss at the second battle of Manassas. Greatly reduced in strength, the Fourteenth fought at Sharpsburg, suffering severely in casualties. Placed in Wilcox's brigade, Anderson's division - with the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh Alabama regiments - it was on the line of the Rappahannock during the winter of 1862 - 3 and was in line of battle on the highths when Burnside was repulsed at Fredericksburg. The regiment was hotly engaged, and with heavy loss, at Salem. It went on the Pennsylvania campaign, and the blood of its veterans was poured out freely at Gettysburg. The winter of 1863 - 4 was passed in camp near Orange C.H. and the Fourteenth was engaged with shocking results at both the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, emerging from those battles with much depleted ranks. Now in Sanders' brigade, Mahone's division, the Fourteenth participated in the numerous and bloody struggles around Petersbrug, during the last ten months of the war. Its colors were furled forever at Appomattox, where only 70 or 80, under Capt. Perry of Lowndes, were present. The names of 1317 men were on its rolls, over 250 of whom perished in battle, 350 died in the service, and 159 were discharged or transferred.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Thomas J. Judge of Montgomery; resigned. A.C. Wood of Randolph; wounded twice; resigned. Lucius Pinkard of Macon; wounded at Gettysburg; retired.

Lieutenant Colonels - David W. Baine of Lowndes; killed at Frazier's Farm. Lucius Pinkard; promoted. James A. Broome of Chambers; wounded at the Wilderness; retired.

Majors - Owen K. McLemore of Chambers; resigned. A.C. Wood; promoted. James A. Broome; promoted. R.A. McCord of Tallapoosa; killed at Chancellorsville. George W. Taylor of Randolph; wounded at Spottsylvania.

Adjutants - Lucius Pinkard of Macon; promoted. James S. Williamson, Jr. of Lowndes; wounded at Gettysburg.



Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Chambers - W.D. Harrington; resigned. J.F. Wallace; killed on picket on the Matapony. S. Hodge.

Lowndes - James S. Williamson; killed at Frazier's Farm. Simeon G. Perry.

Chambers - D.H. McCoy; resigned. M.L. Barber; wounded at Frazier's Farm; transferred to department duty. G.J. Bankston, wounded several times.

Chambers - James A. Broome; promoted. B.H. Pearson; captured on picket. Lieut. H.W. Burns commanded.

Chambers - W.C. Allen; died in the service. J.S.E. Davis; wounded several times.

Chambers - M.P. Ferrel; resigned. J.S. McLean; wounded several times.

Tallapoosa - W.H. Brooks; resigned. J.L. Craig; died in the service. R.. McCord; promoted. J.A. Terrel; promoted. Lieut. H.C. Veasy commanded for some time.

Tallapoosa - W.W. Selman; resigned. W.B. O'Brien; wounded twice; retired. C.H. Lambeth; killed at Wilderness. J.B. Winslett.

Talladega - J.T. Bell; killed at Mechanicsville. E. Folk; killed at Petersburg.

Randolph - A.C. Wood; promoted. George W. Taylor; promoted. G.F. Weaver; wounded; retired. B.I. Pate; wounded; resigned.


13th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Thirteenth was organized at Montgomery, July 19, 1861, and at once proceeeded to Virginia. Ordered to Yorktown, it was there brigaded under Gen. Rains. It lay at that place till the army fell back on Richmond the following spring. At Seven Pines the regiment was engaged warmly, and the casualties were 7 killed and 45 wounded. Held in reserve during the battles in front of Richmond, it was nevertheless subjected there to a destructive fire, from which it suffered severely. As part of Archer's brigade, under Colquitt of Georgia, the regiment took part in the first Maryland campaign, losing lightly at Boonsboro, but heavily at Sharpsburg. The winter was passed on the Rappahannock, and its monotony was relieved by the frightful repulse of Burnside at Fredericksburg, of which the Thirteenth was a witness; and where it suffered lightly. Col. Fry led the brigade in the assault on Hooker at Chancellorsville, and there the Thirteenth lost half of the 460 men with which it went into the battle. It was in the Pennsylvania campaign, and at Gettysburg its colors were planted on the crest of the ridge, where they were torn to shreds, and the regiment was again terribly mutilated. Retiring to Virginia, the Thirteenth passed the winter of 1863-4 mostly in camp. At the Wilderness the regiment actively participated, and the loss was comparatively heavy. It took part in the subsequent operations around Petersburg, being now in the brigade of Gen. Sanders of Greene. - the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments - subsequently commanded by Gen. W.H. Forney of Calhoun. Under Col. Aiken the remnant of about 100 men surrendered at Appomattox. Of the 1245 men on its rolls, about 150 were killed in battle, or died of wounds, 275 died of disease, 64 were transferred, and 202 were discharged.



Field and Staff

Colonels - B.D. Frey of Tallapoosa; wounded at Seven Pines and Sharpsburg, and wounded and captured at Gettysburg; promoted. James Aiken of Randolph.

Lieutenant Colonels - Julius C.B. Mitchell of Montgomery; resigned. Reginald H. Dawson of Wilcox; resigned. Wm. H. Betts of Macon; resigned. James Aiken; wounded at Chancellorsville and Bristow Station; promoted.

Majors - Samuel B. Marks of Montgomery; resigned. Wm H. Betts; promoted. James Aiken; promoted. John T. Smith of Randolph; killed at Chancellorsville; retired. L.P. Broughton of Butler; killed at Wilderness.



Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Cames

Wilcox - R.H. Dawson; elected lieutenant colonel. Jas. D. Clark; killed at Mechanicsville. Samuel Sellers.

Macon - Wm. H. Bettes; promoted. E.C. Chambers; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Coosa - Osceola Kyle; resigned. N.J. Taylor; died in the service. B.A. Bowen.

Randolph - James Aiken; promoted. A.S. Reeves; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Randolph - M.D. Robinson; wounded; retired. John D.H. Robinson; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Tallapoosa - S.T. Strickland; resigned. J.V. Ashurst; wounded at Chancellorsville; retired. James M. Simpson; wounded at Gettysburg.

Butler - John Glasgow; resigned. R.N. Cook; killed at second Cold Harbor.

Coosa - Ellis Logan; resigned. J.A. Allison.

Randolph - John T. Smith; promoted. L.D. Ford.


12th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Twelfth Alabama was organized at Richmond in July1861, and at once moved to the Potomac "front." It was first brigaded under Gen. Ewell of Virginia, who was soon after succeeded by Gen. Rodes of Tuskaloosa. The regiment lay near Manassas during the fall and winter, and moved to Yorktown in the spring of 1862. It was under fire there, and suffered lightly at Williamsburg. At Seven Pines the regiment was in the advance that opened the battle, and stormed the redoubt held by Casey's division, carrying three lines of works by succesive charges, and losing 70 killed and 141 wounded - more than half it had engaged. It participated to some extent in the other battles before Richmond, and mustered 120 men for duty after the battle of Malvern Hill. Still under Rodes, and in D. H. Hill's division, and brigaded with the Third, Fifth, Sixth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments, the Twelfth was in the advance into Maryland. It bore a conspicuous part at Boonsboro, and also at Sharpsburg, losing in these bloody conflicts 27 killed, 69 wounded, and 33 missing out its thinned ranks. Retiring into Virginia with the army, the regiment wintered on the Rappahannock. It was under fire but not actively engaged at Fredericksburg; but it was in the resistless column of Rodes at Chancellorsville, where Col. O'Neal led the brigade, and where the Twelfth charged three lines of breastworks, and was badly mutilated. It skirmished at Brandy Station, and again led the way over the Potomac. At Gettysburg it was on the extreme left, and pressed the enemy in confusion through the town, then supported the grand assault, and afterwards covered the rear. After the army retired into Virginia, the Twelfth was engaged in several skirmishes - at Warrenton Springs, Turkey Run &c. The winter was passed near Orange C.H., and the regiment - Gen. Battle now commanding the brigade - was hotly engaged at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and in the continuous skirmishing of Grant's advance movement to Cold Harbor. The Twelfth then again marched into Maryland when Early threatened Washington. It participated at Winchester with very severe loss, and in the further operations of the corps in the Valley. On its return to Petersburg it took part - now in the Gordon's corps - in the fierce struggles around that historic city, and laid down its arms at Appomattox. Of the original number of 1196, about 50 were at Appomattox; and of the 321 recruits received, about 70 were there. Nearly 250 died of wounds received in battle, about 200 died of disease, and 202 were discharged. The battle-flag of the regiment is now in Mobile.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert T. Jones of Perry; killed at Seven Pines. B.B. Gayle of Morgan; killed at Boonsboro. Samuel B. Pickens of South Carolina; wounded at Spottsylvania and Winchester.

Lieutenant Colonels - Theodore O'Hara of Kentucky; transferred. B.B. Gayle; promoted. Samuel B. Pickens; wounded at Boonsboro; promoted. J.C. Goodgame of Coosa.

Majors - E.D. Tracy of Madison; transferred. John C. Brown of Coffee; resigned. B.B. Gayle; promoted. Samuel B. Pickens; promoted. John C. Goodgame; promoted. Adolph Proskauer of Mobile; wounded at Chancellorsville and Spottsylvania.

Adjutants - Samuel B. Pickens; promoted. Junius L. Walthall of Mobile; transferred. L. Gayle of Virginia.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Cames.

Mobile - George Heuilly; till re-organized. Jule L'Etondal; died in the service. T.H. Rogers; wounded at Winchester.

Coosa - Joseph H. Bradford; till re-organized. John C. Goodgame; promoted. Henry W. Cox; killed at Chancellorsville. Patrick Thomas; killed at Appomattox.

Mobile - Augustus Stykes; resigned. A. Proskauer; promoted. F.C. Fischer. E. Karcher.

Coffee - John C. Brown; promoted. T.C. Horn; resigned. E. Tucker; killed at Sharpsburg. .... Davis. killed at Gettysburg. J. McCassells; killed at the Wilderness.

Dekalb - W. Higgins; resigned. R.F. Patterson; resigned. W.L. Maroney; resigned; John Rogersl killed at Spottyslvania. A. Majors; killed at Snicker's Gap.

Macon - R.F. Ligon; till re-organized. Robert H. Keeling; killed at Seven Pines. J.W. McNeeley; wounded at Chancellorsville transferred. Robert E. Park; wounded at Gettysburg; wounded and captured at Winchester.

Jackson - A.S. Bibb; till re-organized. P.D. Ross wounded at Gettysburg.

Morgan - B.B. Gayle; promoted. C.A. Darwin; killed at Seven Pines. A.E. Hewlett; wounded and captured at Winchester.

Mobile - W.T. Walthall; transferred. John J. Nicholson; wounded at Seven Pines and the Wilderness.Macon - W.H.C. Price; till re-organized. D.H. Garrison; killed at Sharpsburg. Thomas Fitzgerald; killed at Chancellorsville. E.H. Rowell.


11th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Eleventh was enlisted June 17, 1861, at Lynchburg, Va., with 972 men, rank and file, though several of the companies had been in camp for two or three months. Proceeding to Virginia, it reached Winchester in July, and was brigaded under Gen. E.K. Smith of Florida. It remained between Alexandria and Centreville, and near Manassas, till the army moved over to Yorktown. Gen. J.H. Forney of Calhoun had been in temporary command of the brigade, and was succeeded during the winter by Gen. Wilcox. The regiment fell back to Richmond, and was first under fire at Seven Pines, where it lost 9 killed and 49 wounded. It charged the enemy in a strong position at Gaines' Mill, and in a few minutes lost 27 killed and 129 wounded. But it was at Frazier's farm, three days after, that the Eleventh, and other regiments of the brigade, charged across an open field and engaged in a bloody struggle over the enemy's batteries, wherein the bayonet was the chief weapon, and where it lost the commanding officers of eight companies, and a total of 182 killed and wounded. The regiment was under fire at the second battle of Manassas, and lost 25 killed and wounded. It was part of the investing force at Harper's Ferry, and hastened to Sharpsburg, where it was engaged with a loss of thirty-five killed and wounded. It wintered at Rappahannock, and was exposed at Fredericksburg, where the casualties were 12 killed and wounded. As part of Wilcox's brigade, it fought Sedgwick at Salem, where it lost 117 killed and wounded. With the army, it moved into Pennsylvania, and was badly cut up at Gettysburg. The command wintered near Orange Courthouse 1863-4, and tried to gather strength for the last great struggle. At the Wilderness and Spottsylvania the regiment was at close quarters with the foe, and lost about 65 men. Gen. Sanders of Greene was now in command of the brigade. From the Wilderness to Petersburg almost constant skirmishing occurred, and from June 22 to June 30, the loss was about 80 killed and wounded. The Eleventh was in the column that retook the line broken at the "Crater", losing about 40 men, and from August 16 to October 17, which includes the effort to retake the Weldon Railroad, the loss in killed, wounded, and captured was 76. It fought at Burgess' Mill, with severe loss, and was sternly confronting the foe at Appomattox when astounded by the news of the surrender. There were only about 125 of the regiment present there for duty, Capt. Stewart of Pickens commanding. Of 1192 names on its muster roll, over 270 fell in battle, about 200 died of disease, 170 were discharged, and 80 were transferred.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Sydenham Moore of Greene; mortally wounded at Seven Pines. J.C.C. Sanders of Greene; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. George E. Tayloe of Marengo.

Lieutenant Colonels - Stephen F. Hale of Greene; killed at Gaines' Mill. George E. Tayloe of Marengo.

Majors - Isham W. Garrott of Perry; resigned. Archibald Gracie of Mobile; resigned. George Fields of Greene; resigned. Richard J. Fletcher of Washington; disabled at Gettysburg; retired.

Adjutants - Holcombe of Marengo; transferred to line. Walter E. Winn of Marengo; transferred to staff duty. R.Y. Ashe of Marengo; killed near Petersburg. C. Watlington of Marengo.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Cames.

Marengo - Young M. Moody of Marengo; resigned. .... Holcombe; killed at Frazier's farm. John B. Rains.

Greene - George Fields; promoted. William Bratton; killed at Frazier's Farm. George Clark.

Greene - J.C.C. Sanders; wounded at Frazier's Farm. B.T. Higginbotham; wounded at Salem; resigned. R.M. Kennedy; wounded at Petersburg.

Marengo - George E. Tayloe; promoted. John H. Prince.

Washington and Clarke - R.J. Fletcher; promoted. John James; killed at second Cold Harbor.

Bibb - James L. Davidson; resigned. .... Cadell; killed at Petersburg. Zachariah Abney.

Tuskaloosa - James McMath; killed at Frazier's Farm. John B. Hughes; wounded.

Pickens - Reuben Chapman; resigned. M.L. Stewart.

Fayette - .... Trawick; removed. .... Bell; killed at Frazier's Farm. .... Harris; killed at the Crater.

Perry - Henry Talbird; resigned. Mat. M. England; died in the service. Walter C. Y. Parker; mortally wounded at Frazier's Farm. James L. Brazelton; killed at Petersburg. Edward R. Lucas.


10th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, June 4, 1861, and went to Virginia a month later. When it arrived at Winchester it was brigaded under Gen. E.K. Smith, with the Ninth and Eleventh Alabama, Nineteenth Mississippi, and Thirty-eighth Virginia. It saw no active service for several months, and lay near Manassas and Centerville, with Gen. Wilcox in command of the brigade. It was doing some detached duty when attacked at Drainsville, where it lost 21 killed and 64 wounded. The regiment marched to the peninsula, and was shelled at Yorktown. It fought at Williamsburg, and there lost 85 killed and wounded. Held in reserve at Seven Pines, it suffered lightly. The Tenth took a conspicuous part in the battles of Gaines' Mill and Frazier's Farm, and emerged from these terrible conflicts with a loss of over 200 men killed and wounded. It was at the second battle of Manassas and about 30 of its men fell on that sanguinary field. Under fire at Harper's Ferry, it marched rapidly to Sharpsburg, and of the 200 men with which it entered the battle, over half were left dead or wounded there. During the winter of 1862-'3, the Tenth was on the Rappahannock, and saw some active duty, suffering lightly at Hazel River and Fredericksburg. It sustained the shock of Sedgewick's corps at Salem, and of its 400 men engaged, 120 were killed and wounded while the brigade lost 441 casualties, and that exact number of the enemy's dead were counted in its front. In the harvest that death reaped at Gettysburg were 175 of the men of this regiment killed or wounded, of 450 engaged. The Tenth spent the winter of 1863-'4 near Orange C.H., and was hotly engaged at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, losing about 50 killed and wounded in the former, and about 60 in the latter, battle. It participated at the second conflict at Cold Harbor, where it lost about 20 killed and wounded. In the months of August and June, 1864, the Tenth took part in the fierce struggles around Petersburg, suffering severely in the majority of them. At Hatcher's Run it lost 15 or 20 disabled, and about 30 at High Bridge and Farmville, on the retreat to Appomattox. There the regiment furled its colors forever, ten commisioned officers and 208 men being present. Of 1429 names on its rolls, nearly 300 fell in battle or died of wounds, about 180 died of disease, and 249 were discharged or transferred.



Field and Staff

Colonels - John H. Forney of Calhoun; wounded at Drainesville; promoted. John J. Woodward of Talladega; killed at Gaines' Mill. Wm. H. Forney of Calhoun; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. Wm. T. Smith of St. Clair.

Lieutenant Colonels - James B. Martin of Talladega; killed at Drainesville. John J. Woodward; promoted. Wm. H. Forney; wounded and captured at Williamsburg; promoted. John H. Caldwell of St. Clair; resigned. James E. Shelley of Talladega; wounded at Spottsylvania; killed at Petersburg. Wm. T. Smith of St. Clair; promoted. Lewis W. Johnson.

Majors - Taul Bradford of Talladega; resigned. John W. Woodward; promoted. Wm. H. Forney; promoted. John H. Caldwell; promoted. James D. Truss of St. Clair; promoted. L.W. Johnson; promoted.

Adjutants - James B. Martin of Talladega; wounded at Frazier's Farm; resigned. James E. Shelley; transferred to line. George P. Brown of Talladega; killed at Petersburg. J.M. Renfro of Calhoun; transferred to line. B.T. Sides of Talladega.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

St. Clair - John H. Caldwell; promoted. Wilson L. Brewster; resigned. Samuel A. Wyatt; resigned. Leroy F. Box.

Jefferson - Alburto Martin; wounded at the second Manassas; resigned. Wm. A. McMillion; wounded at Gettysburg; resigned. Thomas J. Hickman; wounded at High Bridge.

Shelby - Rufus W. Cobb; resigned.William Lee; killed at Gaines' Mill. Lieut. J.T. Wilson commanded for some time.

Calhoun - Franklin Woodruff; resigned. Richard C. Ragan; killed at Spottsylvania. Frank M. Allen; resigned. Lieut. Thomas H. Martin commanded for some time.

Talladega - John J. Woodward; promoted. Walter Cook; killed at Salem. James E. Shelley; promoted. W.W. Draper.

St. Clair - James D. Truss; promoted. Wm. T. Smith; wounded at Spottsylvania and Petersburg; promoted. B.F. Sides.

Calhoun - Wm. H. Forney; wounded at Drainesville; promoted. George C. Whatley; killed at Sharpsburg. Jas. B. Farmer; wounded at Gaines' Mill; resigned. John A. Cobb; wounded at Wilderness; resigned. James M. Renfro; wounded at Ream's Station. Lieut. T.J. Walker command for some time.

Calhoun - Woodford R. Hanna; resigned. Pickens W. Black; killed at first Cold Harbor. A.T. Martin.

DeKalb - Abner A. Hughes; resigned. Robert W. Cowan; killed at Gaines' Mill. L.E. Hamlin; wounded at Sharpsburg; resigned. Simeon G. Yeargin; wounded at Gettysburg. Lieut. Thomas Christian commanded for some time.

Talladega - J.C. McKenzie; wounded at Frazier's Farm; John Oden; wounded at Sharpsburg; resigned. Henry N. Coleman; killed at Petersburg. S.J. Morris.


9th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This regiment was organized at Richmond, Virginia, the latter part of May 1861, and moved to Winchester several weeks later. It was there brigaded under Gen. Kirby Smith of Florida, but failed to reach the battlefield of Manassas because of a railroad accident. The regiment lay at Manassas Centerville till March 1862, when it marched to Yorktown. Gen. J.H. Forney of Calhoun succeeded to the command of the brigade, and was relieved by Gen. Wilcox in January. The regiment was under fire at Yorktown, with slight loss. It participated in the battle of Williamsburg, but the loss was not severe. At Seven Pines it was held in reserve, and did not suffer. It was now brigaded with the Eighth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments, still under Gen. Wilcox. At Gaines' Mill the regiment sustained severe loss, and was rent and torn by the wall of fire at Frazier's Farm. With the army it took up the line of March for Maryland, and was under fire but not actively engaged at the second Manassas. It was part of the investing force at Harper's Ferry, and hastened from there to the field of Sharpsburg, where it lost 8 killed, 42 wounded, and 9 missing. The Ninth wintered on the Rappahannock, and was under fire, with few casualties, at Fredericksburg. Its brightest renown was won at Salem, where it bore the brunt of a successful assault, and lost very heavily. The regiment moved into Pennsylvania, and sustained severe loss at Gettysburg, where the brigade had 781 killed and wounded. The fall and winter were passed in camp, near Orange C.H., and the Ninth participated in the fierce struggles at the Wilderness, and at Appomattox, with severe loss in each battle. Gen. Sanders of Greene then took command of the brigade. The fighting was almost continuous for several weeks, culminating in the terrible repulse of the invading army at the second battle of Cold Harbor, in which the Ninth shared without severe loss. From June till the end - nine weary months - the regiment was in the trenches of Petersburg, or engaged in the majority of the numerous and bloody battles that relieved the monotony of the last, long, and desperate collision of the great rival armies that had so long struggled on Virginia soil. A remnant of the Ninth surrendered at Appomattox, the brigade having been in command of Gen.W.H. Forney of Calhoun for some months. Of 1138 men on its rolls, about 200 fell in battle, over 175 died of disease and 208 were discharged or transferred.



Field and Staff

Colonels - Cadmus M. Wilcox of Tennessee; promoted. Samuel Henry of Marshall; resigned. Horace King of Morgan; wounded at Gettysburg.

Lieutenant Colonels - Samuel Henry; promoted. Edward A. O'Neal of Lauderdale; transferred. Gaines Smith of Limestone.

Majors - E.A. O'Neal; promoted. Jere Williams of Jackson; resigned. James M. Crow of Lauderdale.

Adjutants - John Burtwell of Lauderdale; transferred. John Featherston of Limestone; transferred to line. James W. Wilson; killed at Sharpsburg. William Holcombe of Limestone; captured at Petersburg.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - F.H. Ripley; resigned. W.C. Murphy; wounded and captured at Williamsburg; killed at Salem. A.H. Hays.

Jackson and Marshall - Jere Williams; promoted. Blake Moore; resigned. Elias Jacobs; wounded at Gettysburg; retired. Patrick Seward; captured.

Limestone - Thomas H. Hobbs; killed at Gaines' Mill. John Featherston; wounded at Gettysburg.

Butler - E.Y. Hill; killed at Gaines' Mill. Thomas Mills; resigned. Mathew Patton.

Lauderdale - D.W. Gillis; killed at Williamsburg. John Chisholm; captured at Gettysburg; died at Fort Delaware. B.F. Taylor; wounded at Sharpsburg; captured at Petersburg.

Marshall - James L. Sheffield; resigned. John Rayburn; killed at Sharpsburg. A.W. Ledbetter; wounded at Salem and Sharpsburg.

Lawrence - James M. Warren; resigned. M.G, May; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Morgan - Horace King; promoted. Wm. Todd; retired.

Limestone - David Houston; resigned. Gaines Smith; captured at Gettysburg; promoted.


Monday, July 25, 2011

8th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

This was the first Alabama command that enlisted "for the war." It was organized by the appointment of its field officers by the war department. The regiment lay at Yorktown, Virginia, the first eleven months of its service, and a detachment of it was engaged in a skirmish near Winn's Mill. Placed in Gen. Pryor's brigade, the regiment fell back with the army till the enemy overtook it at Williamsburg. It won its first laurels on that fiercely-contested field, losing about 100 men. At Seven Pines it was again under the most deadly fire, and its loss was 32 killed, 80 wounded, and 32 missing. Now in the brigade of Gen. Wilcox, --with the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments-- the Eighth was under fire at Mechanicsville, and took part in the desperate assault of Longstreet's division on the enemy's position at Gaines' Mill, and emerged victoriously from the bloody combat with the loss of half of the 350 men it had engaged. Three days later, the regiment was in the line of assault at Frazier's Farm, where it met Meagher's Irish brigade, and of 180 effective men, only 90 were at regimental muster the next morning. Its ranks soon began to fill up, and the Eighth marched with the army towards the Potomac. At the second battle of Manassas it was under a destructive fire, and lost about 60 men, but was held in reserve. The regiment took part in the capture of Harper's Ferry, then crossed the river and fought obstinately at Sharpsburg, where it lost 67 killed and wounded. It wintered at Rappahannock, and lost slightly at Fredericksburg. At Salem Church, Wilcox's brigade of Alabamians, of which it was part, bore the brunt of the federal assault, and drove them back in confusion, capturing 1500 prisoners; the Eighth losing 58 men killed and wounded. It was in the exultant army that Lee led into Maryland the second time, and its colors were flouted in the face of death at Gettysburg; where of 420 engaged, 260 were left on the bloody field. With the army it re-crossed the Potomac, and wintered in the vicinity of Orange C.H. The regiment was again hotly engaged at the Wilderness, losing heavily, and at Spottsylvania suffered considerably. It was under fire nearly every day as the federal army pressed up to Richmond, and its loss was severe at the second Cold Harbor. At Petersburg the Eighth again suffered largely. It fought the cavalry raid on the Weldon Railroad, and participated in the capture of the "Crater." At Deep Bottom the regiment participated with some loss, and lost heavily in the attempt to dislodge the enemy from their position on the Weldon Railroad. The regiment assisted at the repulse of the foe on the plank road below Petersburg, and fought cheerfully on the retreat up the James. At Appomattox the remnant indignantly denied the first rumors of the contemplated surrender, many wept like children at the announcement, and the survivors tore their battle-rent banner into shreds to retain as a memento. Of 1377 men on its roll, the Eighth had 300 killed or mortally wounded, over 170 died of disease, and 236 were discharged or transferred.



Field and Staff.

Colonels - John A. Winston of Sumter; resigned. Young L. Royston of Perry; wounded at Frazier's Farm and Salem Church; retired. Hillary A. Herbert of Butler.

Lieutenant Colonels - John W. Frazier of Tennessee; resigned. Thomas E. Irby of Dallas; killed at Williamsburg. Y.L. Royston; promoted. H.A. Herbert; wounded at Sharpsburg and Wilderness; promoted. John P. Emerich of Mobile; wounded at Petersburg.

Majors - Thomas E. Irby; promoted. Y.L. Royston; promoted. H.A. Herbert; wounded and captured at Seven Pines; promoted. John P. Emerich; wounded at Gaines' Mill; promoted. Duke Nall of Perry; died of wounds received at Wilderness.

Adjutants - Thomas Phelan of Perry; transferred to line. Dan Jones of Dallas; wounded at Frazier's Farm; transferred and promoted. Morgan S. Cleveland of Dallas; wounded at Petersburg.



Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Perry - Young L. Royston; promoted. Thomas Phelan; killed at Gaines' Mill. Thos. Heard; wounded at Wilderness.

Dallas - James Kent; resigned. Robert T. McCrary; killed at Salem. W.R. Knox; wounded at Petersburg.

Perry - Duke Nall; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. W.L. Fagan.

Butler - Hillary A. Herbert; promoted. Lewis A. Livingston; wounded at Gettysburg, and died in the hands of the enemy. Ira W. Stott.

Mobile - Thomas Smith; resigned. C.E. Blackwood; wounded at Frazier's Farm; resigned. A.H. Ravesies; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Mobile - Charles Ketchum; resigned. Leonard F Summers; killed at Seven Pines. Benj. Briggs; resigned. Henry McHugh; killed at Petersburg Crater.

Mobile - J.P. Emerich; promoted. A. Kohler; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Mobile - Patrick Loughry; killed at Seven Pines. C.P. Brannegan; killed at Gettysburg. John McGrath; wounded at Wilderness and Spottsylvania.

Coosa - T.W.W. Davies; resigned. G.W. Hannon; killed at Gaines' Mill. M.E. McWilliams; died in the service. J.T.L. Robinson; wounded at Petersburg.


7th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Seventh organized at Pensacola, May 18, 1861, with eight infantry and two mounted companies. It was composed of twelve months' men, of companies that rendezvoused at that place. It remained on duty there till November, when it was ordered to Chattanooga, and a month later to Bowling Green. It was in a temporary brigade under Col. S.A.M. Wood, and fell back with the army to Corinth. The time of service of most of the companies expired the first week in April 1862, and it disbanded, though the company from Montgomery and Autauga, and other men of the regiment, fought at Shiloh. The mass of the men went at once into other organizations, and rendered efficient service therein.




Field Officers.

Colonel - Sterling A.M. Wood of Lauderdale; promoted.

Lieutenant Colonel - John G. Coltart of Madison.

Major - A.A. Russell of Jackson.

Adjutant - Simeon Dean of Chambers; promoted. S.A. McClung of Madison; transferred to Gen. Wood's staff.




Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Chambers - James M. Jackson; resigned. Flavius J. Graham.

Calhoun - Robert W. Draper.

Cherokee - William H. Clare.

Madison - Oliver B. Gaston.

Barbour - P. Bludworth.

Butler and Pike - William T. McCall.

Jackson - J.B. Ragsdale; resigned. Flavius J. Graham.

Wilcox and Dallas - Thomas G. Jenkins. (Mounted.)

Montgomery and Autauga - Jesse J. Cox. (Mounted.)

Lauderdale - William H. Price.

6th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Sixth Infantry organized at Montgomery, May 6, 1861, with twelve companies, and about 1400 men. It was first ordered to Corinth, and from there went to Virginia. Reaching Manassas Junction, it was brigaded under Gen. Ewell. It was on the field, but not actively engaged in the first Manassas, and passed the fall and winter in that vicinity. General Rodes succeeded Ewell in command of the brigade. In the spring it moved to Yorktown with the army, and there re-organized, and re-enlisted for the war. It was on the field at Williamsburg, but not under fire. At Seven Pines the regiment took a prominent part, suffering terribly, losing 102 killed, and 282 wounded out of about 650 engaged; while the brigade lost 1296 out of about 2500. Its mutilated columns again took a conspicuous part at Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill, and suffered very severely. It was in the advance in the movement across the Potomac, and lost slightly at Boonsboro; but at Sharpsburg was severely cut up, the loss being 52 killed and 104 wounded. The regiment was present, but did not take part at Fredericksburg. With its brigade companions - the Third, Fifth, Twelfth , and Twenty-sixth - Col. O'Neal commanding them, the regiment was in the victorious wave of battle at Chancellorsville, and again its ranks were thinned by its losses. It shared the perils of the Pennsylvania campaign, when Gen. Battle led the brigade, and in the fierce shock on the rocky slopes of Gettysburg it suffered frightfully. Having wintered near Orange Courthouse, the regiment was at the Wilderness, where it lost considerably; and was badly mutilated at Spottsylvania. It took part in the Valley campaign of Gen. Early, and suffered severely at Winchester; and lost a number captured at Cedar Creek. Moving back to Petersburg, it was placed in Fort Mahone, and was almost continuously under fire till its colors were folded at Appomatox; its number present being about 80 men under Lieut. Col. Culver. Of 2109 names on its rolls, nearly 400 perished in battle, 243 died of disease in the service, and 675 were discharged or transferred.




Field and Staff

Colonels - John J. Seibels of Montgomery; till re-organized. John B. Gordon of Jackson; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. James N. Lightfoot of Henry; wounded at Chancellorsville and Spottsylvania.

Lieutenant Colonels - Benjamin H. Baker of Russell; resigned. John B. Gordon; promoted. James J. Willingham of Lowndes; killled at Seven Pines. James N. Lightfoot; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. A.M. Gordon of Jackson; killed at Chancellorsville. George W. Hooper of Russell; disabled by accident; retired. Isaac F. Culver of Henry; wounded at Winchester.

Majors - John B. Gordon; promoted. S. Perry Nesmith of Lowndes; killed at Seven Pines. A.M. Gordon; promoted. George W. Hooper; promoted. Isaac F. Culver; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted.

Adjutants - George Goldthwaite, Jr. of Montgomery; resigned. .... Pace of Georgia; transferred. John Whit Thomas of Henry; killed at Spottsylvania. Edgar Watson of Montgomery; killed at Farmville.




Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Henry - Alexander C. Gordon; resigned. James N. Lightfoot; promoted. Isaac F. Culver; wounded at Boonsboro; promoted. Thomas Lightfoot; killed at Winchester.

Lowndes - James J. Willingham; elected lieutenant colonel. M.L. Bowie; wounded at Sharpsburg and Spottsylvania; retired.

Montgomery - Gabriel DuVal; resigned. M.L. Kirkpatrick; till re-organized. Mathew Fox; killed at Seven Pines. John W. Burton; wounded and captured at Gettysburg. Lieut. Wat. Waller commanded.

Macon - John M. Kennedy; till re-organization. W.D. Rowe; wounded at Winchester.

Russell - James F. Waddell; till re-organization; Augustus S. Flournoy; killed at Seven Pines. R.M. Greene; wounded at Wilderness and Winchester.

Montgomery - S.G. Hardaway; till re-organization. John B. McCarthy; killed at Seven Pines. John Lawler; resigned.

Wilcox - George Lynch; till re-organization. Julius A. Kimbrough; wounded at Gettysburg.

Autauga - Thomas A. Davis; appointed surgeon. Wm. F. Davis; resigned. Green H. Thompson.

Jackson - Wm.T. Gunter; till re-organized. W.C. Hunt; wounded at Seven Pines and Gettysburg; killed at Cedar Creek.

Jackson - Wm.L. Gordon; till re-organization. A.M. Gordon; wounded at Seven Pines; promoted.

Henry - T.T. Smith; resigned. Thomas Bell; killed at Seven Pines.

Russell - Walter H. Weems; till re-organized. George W. Hooper; promoted. N.S. Black.

5th Alabama Infantry, Field and Staff Officer's and Unit History, from Willis Brewer's "Alabama: Her History, Resources, War Record and Public Men, 1540-1872"

The Fifth Infantry was organized at Montgomery, May 5, 1861, and at once moved to Pensacola. A few days after, it proceeded to Virginia, and took post near Manassas Junction in the brigade of Gen. Ewell. It was in the skirmish at Farr's X Roads, and was on the field but not engaged at the first Manassas. It remained in the vicinity of Manassas during the fall and winter, and Gen. Rodes became the brigade commander in October - the Sixth and Twelfth of Alabama, and the Twelfth of Mississippi, being the other regiments of the brigade. Moving with the army to Yorktown in March 1862, it there re-enlisted and re-organized. It was under fire at Yorktown, and was on the field at Williamsburg. At Seven Pines the regiment received its baptism of blood, losing 27 killed and 128 wounded. The regiment was hotly engaged at Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill, losing 15 killed and 58 wounded. It was not at the second Manassas battle, but moved into Maryland, and shared in the stubborn conflicts at Boonsboro and Sharpsburg, losing 11 killed and 39 wounded out of the remnant present for duty. It was in line of battle on the crest, and saw Burnside's bloody repulse at Fredericksburg; and at Chancellorsville it was in the invincible line under Rodes that swept everything before it; reaping its brightest renown, and losing heavily. It moved into Maryland and Pennsylvania on the Gettysburg campaign, and its loss was very severe in that battle. Having wintered at Orange C.H., the Fifth, now reduced to a mere skeleton, participated in the battles of the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and without severe loss. It took part in the subsequent operations as the lines began to be drawn around Petersburg, losing slightly at the second Cold Harbor. It went with Early into the Valley and across the Potomac, taking part in numerous engagements with the foe, and losing severely at Winchester. It soon after took its place in the memorable trenches of Petersburg, and wintered there. Only 25 or 30 men were around its colors when they were surrendered at Appomattox, under Capt. Riley. Of 1719 names on its rolls, nearly 300 perished in battle, 240 others died in the service, and 507 were discharged or transferred.




Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert E. Rodes of Tuskaloosa; promoted. Allen C. Jones of Greene; till reorganized. Christopher C. Pegues of Dallas; killed at first Cold Harbor. Josephus Hall of Clarke; wounded at Spottsylvania; resigned. Edwin LaFayette Hobson of Greene.

Lieutenant Colonels - Allen C. Jones; promoted. John T. Morgan of Dallas; resigned. Josephus Hall; promoted. Edwin L. Hobson; promoted. Eugene Blackford of Barbour.

Majors - John T. Morgan; promoted. H.A. Whiting of Tuskaloosa; transferred to Gen. Rodes' staff. E.L. Hobson; promoted. Eugene Blackford; promoted.

Adjutants - H.A. Whiting; promoted. Robert I. Smith of Mobile; till re-organized. Charles J. Pegues of Dallas.




Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Tuskaloosa - Wm H. Fowler. (Company transferred to artillery at the close of the first year's service).

Greene - E.L. Hobson; promoted. J.W. Williams; captured at Boonsboro.

Pickens - Syd. H. Ferguson; till re-organization. T.C. Belsher; wounded.

Sumter - John H. Dent; till re-organized. N.R.E. Ferguson; killed at Wilderness. James H. Holmes.

Sumter - Rob't P. Blount; resigned. Jas. V. Tutt; wounded at Seven Pines. George Reed; killed near Winchester.

Dallas - C.C. Pegues; promoted. E.B. Moseley.

Clarke - Josephus Hall; promoted. S.M. Woodward.

Monroe - Giles Goode; died in the service. T.J. Riley.

Talladega - Charles M. Shelley; resigned. William T. Renfro; killed at Chancellorsville. N.S. McAfee.

Barbour - Eugene Blackford; promoted. L.S. Chitwood.

Lowndes (1862) - D.W. Johnson; killed at Cold Harbor. Thomas S. Herbert; resigned. John M. Gilchrist; killed at second Cold Harbor.